Gin New Western Dry Gin

Review NamGin

A guest from Namibia

Today I would like to present you a gin from Africa, more precisely a dry gin from Namibia. So far we have had relatively few gins from Africa to test, so we are even more happy to present you a gin from Namibia today.

A special feature of the NamGin that is definitely worth mentioning is the fact that the neutral alcohol or basic alcohol is not usually made from wheat or potatoes, but the NamGin neutral alcohol consists of dates. I have never tasted it before and honestly have no idea if the aroma of the neutral alcohol changes, but we will find out in the course of the NamGin tasting.

The botanicals used are the devil’s claw, lavender, rosemary, coriander, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, lime, lemon, orange and peppermint. Unfortunately you don’t get the information how many and which botanicals are used in the whole. As highlight botanical the devil’s claw is processed in the NamGin. This botanical is a medicinal plant from Namibia.

For a 500 ml bottle of NamGin Dry Gin you have to pay about 42 Euro. For this you get a Dry Gin from Africa with 45% alcohol content . The gin is distilled in the Naute crystal distillery. You can buy the gin in the NamShop.

How does the NamGin?

smell?

Also with the NamGin I would like to go briefly into the design of the bottle. The bottle itself is very dark. White and grey writing as well as red icons decorate the bottle. E I like the fact that the dark design of the bottle is a devil’s claw and thus the botanical moves a bit further into the foreground. Now the bottle NamGin is finally opened. The bottle is closed with a black plastic cap.

Nosing is about analyzing the gin in the nose. Now I pull the bottle Dry Gin under my nose and breathe in deeply. The first breath happens and my nose starts to analyze. The gin looks much sweeter than I expected. One can see a slight chocolate aroma, but is that really cocoa? Beside the sweetness which dominates in the first moment you notice citrus, rosemary and the sharpness of ginger which skillfully catches the sweetness again. A discreet floral note is also noticeable. These aromas and nuances are embedded in the clear juniper note – which, however, is very mild.

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In the nose the gin reminds me more of a playful New Western Dry Gin than of a classic Dry Gin.

How does gin from Namibia taste?

Let us now come to the most important part of the test report – the actual tasting. Of course as usual without tonic water and without ice. Also this time I give the NamGin a few minutes to unfold completely in the fresh air. By the way, the gin is drunk at room temperature.

The gin flows into my palate and I start to analyse it. On the palate the gin is less sweet than the first impression in the nose would suggest. At the top of the gin you notice an aroma that is slightly sweet, slightly spicy and slightly tart – really hard to describe. It tastes somehow healthy! After the tip has pulled away the citrus aromas come to the fore but also the floral nuances come to the fore after the dominant tip and want to have a say in the overall impression. As the gin slowly disappears from my mouth there is a some strange aroma left in the palate that slowly gets milder. Strange because I just don’t know the aroma and it looks somehow “healthy”.

Tasting summary NamGin

The NamGin is without question a special gin. But I don’t know if Dry Gin is the right name for this gin, because it already moves very far away from the classic flavours. I think New Western Dry Gin would be the right description. Overall the NamGin makes a solid and complex impression , for experimental gin lovers definitely worth a purchase, because the aroma is very unique.

  • Gin from Namibia
  • Neutral alcohol is extracted from dates
  • exceptional aroma
  • devil’s claw as botanical highlight

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